This is why the stock market will go up from here

The first half of the year has come and gone. The S&P 500 ground its way higher and finished the first half up 9.3%. Unsurprisingly it has been robust S&P earnings that drove the markets to new all-time highs. Reported earnings were up 18% year over year. Despite the new administration's failure to pass new tax policy so far, analysts weren't expecting much movement in 2017 so earnings estimates haven't disappointed in the least. In fact, companies have continued to beat expectations on the top and bottom line and we expect more of the same in the second half. This has the Runnymede investment team optimistic heading into the second half of the year. As the market continues to hit new highs, there seems to be a guru warning of the next crash on a weekly basis. Just ignore the noise for now.

Would you entrust your investments to a guy named Dr. Doom?

I recently went to see a local production of "The Emperor's New Clothes" which is based off a short story by Hans Christian Anderson where two weavers promise an emperor a new suit of clothes that they say is invisible to those who are unfit for their positions, stupid or incompetent. When the emperor parades before his subjects in his new clothes, no one dares to say that they don't see anything for fear that they will be seen as unfit or stupid. Finally a child cries out, "But he isn't wearing anything at all!" and the weavers are exposed for the frauds that they are. Sadly this happens in real life and market gurus who get airtime on popular financial TV programs are there for entertainment, not for actual substance. Make sure that you know the difference.

Will interest rates rise sharply as the Fed shrinks its balance sheet?

I usually reserve Friday blog posts for lighter topics but with the FOMC meeting this week, I think it is important to touch on the Fed's plan to shrink its $4.5 trillion balance sheet. While the announcement was widely expected, it spelled out in greater detail plans to slowly unwind the Fed's sizable bond holdings. We believe that this step is very positive alongside interest rate hikes. The economy is doing well enough that the Fed can step back from its emergency measures, thus saving ammo for the next recession. We do not believe that this will cause a spike in long term rates but will monitor the situation closely.

Is another 1987 crash around the corner?

During a bull market, it seem like every single year a chart will start circulating comparing the current price action to a terrible period like 2008, 1987 or even 1929. Well today is that time again. Yogi Berra said it best: "It's like déjà vu all over again." Here is the chart that is making its rounds on Wall Street.

The US is going to crash and it will be massive?

Recently one of our clients sent me over an article from Yahoo Finance titled Mark Yusko: 'The US is going to have a crash and it will be massive.' Clearly that is a great title for an article because it is scary as hell. Just keep in mind in today's world, you have to say something like that to get quoted. Writers know that is great click bait. They salivate over quotes like that one from Yusko. But more importantly to me and you, is this really going to happen? Is the market going to crash? Perhaps eventually, but not likely in the near term. Is it going to be massive? Almost impossible to answer. Our view is that the market is still heading higher. S&P earnings are growing in the low teens and the global economy is on the upswing. Interest rates remain extremely low and are still near zero in Japan and Europe. These conditions don't suggest an imminent crash but we are always monitoring variables that could change our outlook.

Weakening dollar adding fuel to earnings growth

Last fall, the US Dollar rose after the election and many pundits worried about the effect of the rising dollar on corporate earnings from abroad. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin advocates a strong dollar over the long term which is a policy that has been in place for more than two decades. Here are his thoughts:

The Trump news flow is overwhelming. What should we do?

Yesterday on Bloomberg, Barry Ritholtz posed the question "The Trump news flow is overwhelming. What should we do?

What would US stocks do if President Trump suddenly resigned?

Last Wednesday, Convergex's Chief Strategist Nick Colas pondered on this question, "What would US stocks do if President Trump resigned?"

Grantham: This isn't a bubble

Whenever markets reach new highs, it is inevitable that people begin to ponder if this is a top or even worse, a bubble. This led the WSJ to ask famed investor Jeremy Grantham point blank, "Is the US market in a bubble or is it different this time?" His response is certainly worth a few minutes of your time.

A lesson from Warren Buffett on buying fear Part 3

On the Runnymede blog, I have discussed buying fear in 2014 and 2015. The thesis is simple and taken from the great Warren Buffett. His famous rule is "Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful. While this seems like a simple rule, even Buffett admits that it is easier said than done. Buffett said, "There is no comparison between fear and greed. Fear is instant, pervasive and intense. Greed is slower. Fear hits."

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